Opus XIII: About Death. Second Part

16. December to 17. April 2016

The “Brahmsfantasy”, first printed in Leipzig 1894, is based on compositions by Johannes Brahms. Max Klinger, himself a keen musician, admired Brahms, 24 years his senior. In “About Death”, Klinger returned to the theme of death he had already visited in his Opus XI. His work on this cycle occupied him for 25 years. Klinger himself wrote: “I am attempting to add a larger, wider form, in which the grand principles and the inner catharsis clash with the petty coincidences and the outward terror to enable a harmonious conclusion.” … read more


11th Art Award of the Leipziger Volkszeitung

28. November to 28. February 2016

Owen Gump, born 1980 in California and now mainly resident of Berlin, initially studied under Thomas Ruff and Walter Nikkels at Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, before continuing his education with Peter Piller at the Academy of Visual Arts Leipzig. Owen Gump’s photographs invite viewers to perceive the landscapes of the American West – the desert of Nevada, the coastline of California – not as an apparent visual manifestation of natural beauty, and instead to recognise in them all that has been carved into their surfaces, and the traces of use that these expanses of land carry, whether visible or hidden. … read more

Eugène Delacroix &
Paul Delaroche

History as a sensation

11. October to 17. January 2016

Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863) and Paul Delaroche (1797-1856) number amongst the most significant historic painters of the 19th century in France, with their historic paintings causing a stir in the Paris Salon from around 1820 onwards. Although Delaroche has slipped into near obscurity in the meantime and Delacroix is regarded as the more modern of the two, Delaroche won far greater recognition from his contemporaries for his startling realism in the depiction of historical events. For the first time, these two artists are now to be contrasted with one another in one exhibition. The depiction of history in the era from 1820 to 1850 was influenced to a large extent by the experience of major social upheavals following hard on the heels of each other (French Revolution 1789, rise and fall of Napoleon, the restoration, the revolutions of 1830 and 1848). Under the influence of the romantic current pervading literature and the establishment of the science of history, both painters placed the emotional effect of history in the … read more